Cozy French Knitted Advent Wreath :: Tutorial

french knitted adevent wreath

It’s this time of the year…

The crazy wreath making time of the year. I was going to show you a different one from what you see right now. The one I planned (for two years), made and then I realized I can’t show you because my mom reads along… So I had to come up with another idea.

Looking around in my chaos that is my craft lab the idea of a cozy advent wreath hit me. Well maybe it was because I am all crazy about my french knitting lately. So why not combine the two and make a nice simple french knitted advent wreath, right?

Let’s make this french knitted advent wreath:

1. You need: a wreath form, glue (gun), wool and a french knitting tool.

2. First you have to make your yearn thread (or as I call them sausage). I used a ball of 50 meter yarn for a xx cm wreath form.

3. Decide your layout. You could wrap it around the form or you could layer it starting in the middle. I decided on the latter.

french knitted advent wreath details

4. Next one is simple. Glue to the form. You can pull the thread a bit if you need. I did that towards the end because I thought it might not be enough. In the end I was left with a bit extra to make the little bow.

5. Time for decoration and candle attaching. You need four nails, candles and deco material to your liking.

6. I clipped of the nail heads with pliers. Then I heated the nail over a candle flame and drove them into the candle. I learned that the candle will not break as easily if you heat the nail. Due to the wick it is often tough to place it directly in the center. If you manage that would be preferable so that the candle will be straight on your wreath. Otherwise it could be a bit tilted.

french-knitted-adevent-wreath-details

Now comes the fun part of decorating your wreath. I already liked the clean look of the braided style of the thread so I just added a few sparkles by glueing little bells onto the wreath. (As you can see I didn’t use the lavender ribbon I originally intended.)

And done.

french-knitted-adevent-wreath_

As this wreath is made of wool and tall candles it’s really nothing I want to leave unattended in a room. So maybe I would add some metal candle holder in a future project.

Now I am curious. Have you made your advent wreath already? What does it look like? Please leave a link if it is on your blog/Instagram. I always love looking at other creations.

Lovely crafting y’all,

Tobia

Need more ideas for wreathes? Check out the 2015 Snow Wreath, 2014 Snowball Star Wreath or the 2013 Walnut Wreath. Still not enough? Here are some collections of inspirations with different themes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.

Submitted to creadienstag, Handmade on TuesdayDienstagsdinge, Herzlich eingeladen, Herzblut, sonntagsglück and Kreativas.

Sorbian Easter Eggs {Tutorial}

Hello,

I have a confession to make: I am not big into Easter decorations at all. Heck I don’t even own Easter decorations. Usually it’s just a pot of flowers and that’s about it.

I grew up with a one simple decoration. Every year we would cut some birch twigs and put them in a huge vase. On Saturday before Easter we would then hang easter eggs to decorate. And as I grew up in a area in Germany where there is a minority called Sorbs living, most of our eggs where made in their traditional way – at least that’s how I remember.

sorbian easter eggs tutorial

Since last year I was having the urge to give this craft another try. I remember we did it as kids but the eggs probably looked horrible. Maybe I can find some on this year’s Easter bouquet.

The sorbs have four different techniques for decorating their easter eggs but I only know how to do the wax batik technique. Wax is applied with special quills to the eggs shell and in various usually very detailed and complicated patterns. Then it is dyed. Different colors can be achieved by dying in many different steps and in-between applying more wax.

To make Sorbian Easter Eggs with the wax batik technique a bit of preparation required though.

Eggs.

I recommend doing this technique on blown out eggs. It is time consuming and it would be sad to have them broken on Easter morning. However it’s up to you but make sure to boil them before starting to craft. Usually the eggs have stamps on them that need to go. With a bit of soap and a brush or sponge you usually get it off. You could also use nail polish remover but you really need to wash the eggs carefully afterwards otherwise the dye will not stick.

Tools.

Feathers are your drawing or better stamping tool for this craft. It’s important to get feather from the wings and goose feathers* are recommended. Then you cut of most of the thin hairlike thingies left and right of the bone of the feather until you have only the tip left. (Sorry not sure how that is called in English but you hopefully know what I mean.) Now you cut your shape. (I just read that a cutter is better suited than scissors… Well next time…) For basic patterns you would need a triangle, a drop, diamond and a arrow shape. The dots are made with the heads of a pin.
tutorial sorbian easter eggs quills and tools

In the picture below you can see what kind of (traditional) shapes can be made with those basic tools:

basic shapes for sorbian easter eggs
source: www.sorbische-ostereier.de

Once you have the quills you need the wax. It is important to use a mixture of regular candle wax and bees wax. The bees wax makes it more flexible to apply and also easier to get off as it melts faster. You also need a tinplate spoon. I used mine out of New Years Eve lead-pouring kit. Then set up you station by curving the spoon in a 90° angle and pushing it into a flower pot. Place a tea light underneath and add a bit of wax to the spoon. Now you are ready to go.

tutorial sorbian easter eggs wax station

How to do Sorbian Easter Eggs.

Your first egg will probably look horrible. Its ok because it’s to learn how the quill works. It is important to work fast and with a steady hand. Not always easy.

  1. Put your quill to the wax and make sure its fully soaked (first time) or fully melted (after already using it). You can see tiny little bubbles.
  2. Now press the quill to the shell and remove immediately. I found it to be practical to remove the tip by slightly moving it towards your body (always making sure you don’t mess up the pattern). If you let the quill rest too long the wax will melt and then you have to jerk the quill away and usually this results in tiny wax drops all over the egg shell.
  3. When you are done with your pattern you can dye your egg. Use only cold dye otherwise the wax will melt. If you are planning to do a two colored egg you only need to have it in the dye a very short time. Otherwise the difference is hard to see.

The following picture shows the steps for a simple wax batik egg with only one dyeing:

tutorial sorbian easter eggs 1 color1. your cleaned egg // 2. wax is applied // 3. after dyeing // 4. after wax is removed

And here you can see the steps for a two colored egg.

tutorial sorbian easter eggs1. your cleaned egg // 2. first coat of wax applied // 3. after first dyeing // 4. second coat of wax applied on dyed surface // 5. after second dyeing // 6. after wax is removed

You get the idea. You can go with multiple dyeing rounds when your pattern requires it. My brain however can only think ahead two rounds.

4. Once you are done with your egg you can start to remove the wax. We used to do it over an gas flame but this time we put the eggs in the oven. Preheat oven to 50°C/120°F, put paper towels on your grate or baking pan and add eggs for about 3 minutes. Wipe of melted wax with an old rag. Tada and you just made your first Sorbian Easter Egg.

How to do patterns.

This is the hard part, something coming with practice I guess. However I found it useful to divide up your egg by either going in a circle from top to bottom or by making a line at the thickest part of the egg. This gives some direction to help with the symmetry. And symmetry is key when it comes to Sorbian eggs. For more complicated patterns I thought it was easier starting from the middle and working your way out of the pattern. I saw online that some people predraw the patterns with a pencil. I don’t understand how this works as you can’t get it of once the wax is covering it. Maybe after dying but that requires the dye covers the rest of the predrawing. Well you figure it out and let me know.

Here are a few patterns I have tried:

sorbian easter egg 2 colored blue by craftaliciousme

sorbian easter egg 1 colored by craftaliciousme

sorbian easter egg 2 colored by craftaliciousme

sorbian easter egg 2 colored red by craftaliciousme

If you need more inspiration and ideas follow my Pinterest Board.
Follow Tobia’s board SPRING :: EASTER on Pinterest.

I found this craft amazingly meditative and I am really hooked. I am pretty sure we have a few more days of scrambled eggs ahead of us.

What do you think, will you give it a try or is it too complicated for you? How do you dye your easter eggs?

Happy wax dipping,

Tobia

PS. If you want to read a bit more about the traditions and helpful tipps check out www.sorbische-ostereier.de (only German)

*affiliate link (more info here)

White Snowball Wreath :: This year’s Advent wreath tutorial

Snowball Wreath

Hello There,

so nice of you to join me and have a look at my annual advent wreath making.

For this year I felt all cozy and cuddly and I knew it needed to be something soft. After I cut up my favorite pullover last year it seems to be a trend.

My frequent readers know I am such a sucker for snow. And since it will be a while in my part of the world until we have some – if any at all – I decided on a white snowball wreath this year.

It’s another simple one and probably a great DIY for kids as well. Anyhow I made a tiny tutorial.

Snowball Wreath tutorial craftaliciousme

It’s actually so simple that it feels weird to write the steps down but here we go.

  1. Gather your supplies: Cotton balls, wreath form and glue.
  2. Glue cotton balls on the bottom outside of the wreath form.
  3. Glue cotton balls on the bottom inside of the wreath form.
  4. Fill the remaining gap with cotton balls. Don’t do it all symmetrical but mix it up.
  5. Enjoy your wreath.

Be careful not leave it unattanded if you are thinking about adding a candle. I only put a big one in the middle but I think I might use it as a door wreath.

What I learned:

  • Don’t use a glue gun and a foam wreath form.
    The hot glue eats it away
  • Actually use regular glue its fine and it will stick.

I am quite happy with the outcome. Please share if you decide to do your own version of this wreath.

Happy pre-advent DIYing,

Tobia

Starry Night #18 * Star Decoration * DIY Advent Calendar

pins on cork board

Today I have a really quick DIY you can almost do on the go. And once again most of you should have at the items you need at home. Let do some Christmas Star Decoration with cork coasters!

 

star decoration

All you need is

♥ cork coaster
♥ pins
♥ a stencil

star decoration

 

I painted my star partner with tailor chalk on the chalkboard and then pinned away. It is not as easy as it looks to get a similarity. I figured I do the corners and then evenly spread pins in between.

Pretty easy, huh? Now go put it on a shelf and enjoy.

#18_starry night_pin on cork board

Have a great day, Tobia

Starry Night #16 * Twig Star * DIY Advent Calendar

Twig Star

Hey everyone,

Just one more week and Christmas is here! Yeah!

Today I have another nature inspired Star DIY for you.

Twig Star

I collected six twigs and cut them to same size length. Get some yarn or pretty ribbon and bind together two triangles. When you have those done, bind them together and you have a 6-peak-star.

twig star

You can also make two squares and you’ll receive a fuller star.

Pretty simple but looks great!

Happy crafting, Tobia